artandsciencejournal:

Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info
artandsciencejournal:

Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info
artandsciencejournal:

Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info
artandsciencejournal:

Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info

artandsciencejournal:

Recycling New Technologies

When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.

But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?

Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.

Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.

-Anna Paluch

archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.
Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.
"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.
[via My Modern Metropolis]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.
Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.
"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.
[via My Modern Metropolis]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.
Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.
"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.
[via My Modern Metropolis]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.
Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.
"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.
[via My Modern Metropolis]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.
Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.
"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.
[via My Modern Metropolis]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.
Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.
"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.
[via My Modern Metropolis]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.
Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.
"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.
[via My Modern Metropolis]
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.

Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.

"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.  Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery
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turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.  Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery
Zoom Info
turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.  Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery
Zoom Info
turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.  Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery
Zoom Info
turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.  Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery
Zoom Info
turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.  Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery
Zoom Info
turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.  Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery
Zoom Info

turecepcja:

Born in Wexford, Jimmy Lawlor now lives and works in Mayo. Initially working in the field of Illustration, Jimmy opted to devote all of his time to a career in fine art painting in the late 1990s. He has since exhibited extensively in galleries throughout Ireland and had many images published alongside magazine articles and advertisements.
Jimmy’s work derives its inspiration from his pastoral surroundings. He presents familiar scenes of rural Ireland: the people, towns, landscapes and animals, but with a humorous twist; often illustrating literal transcriptions of colloquial expressions.  via Oisín Gallery